Denzel Washington Under Fire for Telling Black Americans to Stop Blaming “The System”

Denzel Washington is under fire for believing that African Americans “can’t blame the system” for black incarceration rates.  The audacity!  The liberal media and many other Twitter users are using the opportunity to skewer the famous actor.

Washington spoke to the New York Daily News at the premiere of his new film, Roman J. Israel, Esq.  He said:

It starts at the home.  It starts at home.

The reporter asked Washington to expand upon his answer, the 62-year-old Mount Vernon native replied:

It starts with how you raise your children. If a young man doesn’t have a father figure, he’ll go find a father figure.

So you know I can’t blame the system.  It’s unfortunate that we make such easy work for them.

I grew up with guys who did decades (in prison), and it had as much to do with their fathers not being in their lives as it did to do with any system.  Now I was doing just as much as they were, but they went further.

I just didn’t get caught, but they kept going down that road and then they were in the hands of the system.

But it’s about the formative years. You’re not born a criminal.

The liberal outrage was swift and ruthless.

So, because Denzel Washington encouraged family and responsibility, the liberals believe he has endangered African Americans.  Are his ideas really that farfetched?

He encouraged strong father figures to step forward and raise their children.  That is something I believe all Americans can get behind.  In fact, he is backed by numerous studies.

From the Conservative Tribune:

A 1987 study from the Department of Justice among juvenile offenders in America similarly found that “(a)bout 70% of the juveniles and young adults did not live with both parents while they were growing up.” A 1994 study in Wisconsin found that only 13 percent of juvenile offenders lived with both parents, according to The Atlantic.

And it’s not just prison. In 1994, Sara McLanahan at The American Prospect noted that children from single parent households “are twice as likely to drop out of high school, 2.5 times as likely to become teen mothers, and 1.4 times as likely to be idle — out of school and out of work — as children who grow up with both parents. Children in one-parent families also have lower grade point averages, lower college aspirations, and poorer attendance records. As adults, they have higher rates of divorce.

“These patterns persist even after adjusting for differences in race, parents’ education, number of siblings, and residential location,” McLanahan added.

2 Comments

  1. Diane November 29, 2017
  2. Chris D. November 29, 2017

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